Tag Archive | Beaded

New Direction

 

I’m pretty excited with the new direction my shop is going.  Not only will I continue to design and sell beading tutorials and offer my finished creations, I am expanding my shop to include vintage items such as gloves, greeting cards, accessories,  jewelry, beads, and more.

Click on these pictures to take you to my shop’s items, where you can see more items and full descriptions.

I invite you visit Miss Poppy’s Boutique on Etsy.  I’ll be adding more vintage and new items periodically.

Happy New Year!

 

 

 

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Crochet Beadwork

We took my class offerings to a new medium last week – beadwork a la crochet.

Crochet beadwork is a technique with which I busied myself several years ago, during a time when I couldn’t get enough of crocheting.  Wanting a little uniqueness to some of my doilies, I strategically placed tiny seed beads within the stitches as I worked them.  Adding beads to my work added the texture and visual interest for which I was looking. They turned out beautifully.

It came across my thoughts again several weeks ago when I was developing and scheduling my classes.  Why not offer this, a little “something different”?

This time, during my class, my friends and I decided to make some summertime beach-worthy bracelets.  My pattern is simple and basic enough for the beginning crocheter, and incorporates single and half-double crochet stitches with size 10 crochet thread in ecru and inexpensive glass or wooden beads.  It does work up fairly quickly, but still, it takes about two hours to complete, depending on how fast or slow you are as a crocheter.

Three of my students chose to create their pieces using glass beads; one chose colorful round wooden beads.  My friend who chose the wooden beads took my pattern in a little different direction.  She added a few extra rows, sans beads, to one of the edges:

CrochetBracelet1

The others completed their bracelets with glass beads, and they also turned out pretty.  (I think my photograph of them turned out pretty nifty, too!)  I think they would look good with black thread, too, don’t you?

CrochetBracelet2

Notice that a matching bead does its work as a “clasp” that blends in nicely.  They are ready for the pool or beach!

I plan on writing out the tutorial for my pattern that is public-worthy, and will announce its availability here when I get it written.

Enjoy your creativity!

©Susan Marie Molloy, Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

What’s in a Name

Here we are at the beginning of a new week, and noticing last week went by fast. It definitely was a busy one at my studio.

I held another class. It was a basic needle weaving session using the gourd, or peyote, stitch. This was a new stitch for a few of my six students, and a nice refresher for others. We used one of my own earring designs as a starting point.

This stitch has been around for millennia, and goes as far back as ancient Egypt. I grew up knowing it as the gourd stitch; at some point beaders today more commonly use the term “peyote stitch” instead. What is interesting is that the term “gourd stitch” derives its name from American Indians decorating gourd containers, and “peyote stitch” is derived from American Indians decorating decorative objects used in their peyote ceremonies. Nonetheless, it is the same basic stitch.

I like it for its simplicity and versatility. When I create something using only Delica seed beads, the piece turns out smooth, flat, and slinky. I have modified patterns by using various sizes of seed beads, the most well-known of these is the Cellini stitch. It’s peyote gone ‘round and ‘round with a lot of interesting bumpiness!

We had fun at my class, and we learn from one another. I hold the belief that not only can experienced beaders share their knowledge and talents, but novice beaders bring a lot to the table, too. They see things with fresh, new eyes. And sharing and discussing some background history about the art of beading keeps our conversations between us beaders delightful and positive – and it makes it so much more enjoyable to want to learn more, and to return to my studio to learn and share even more.

©2016 Susan Marie Molloy, Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, The Rosary Shoppe, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

Needling

Needle

Beading needles should not be so damaged during the first project. This is bad.

One of the most important suggestions I cannot stress enough is using very good quality tools, including beading needles.

I make the mistake of buying beading needles made in China.  Of the five in the pack I bought, three broke within a couple of weeks.  One of them broke off in my finger (you can read about that debacle here in my blog, “Safety First“).

 

I have some wide eyed beading needles from India.  Fair to good, I would say, but they bend, curve, and twist like crazy.  These aren’t worth it, unless you’re using them for one project only.

The best beading needles, by far, are ones made in Japan.  I find them sturdy and available in all sizes and lengths to help you create your professional beadwork.

The slightly extra cost is worth it.  You would actually be spending more in the long run if you kept on buy Chinese made needles, for sure.

Happy Beading,

Susan Marie Molloy

Designer and Owner of Miss Poppy’s Boutique

 

Spring Show

We set up our table at the Emerald Coast Bead Society Spring Bead Show earlier this month, and the event was successful. It was held at a local church in town.

My husband, who is an artist and owns Gene’s Joint, and I shared a table. This arrangement worked well. We could take breaks and cover one another’s’ items, and not skip a beat.

There's Gene from Gene's Joint preparing for the show.

There’s Gene from Gene’s Joint preparing for the show.

We visited our fellow artists’ tables, and we found some pretty nifty creations and supplies. We had a lot of fun talking and laughing with a fellow member whose table was behind ours. Fun times!

All of our fellow bead society members made lovely art, including jewelry, handcrafted glass and polymer clay beads, and similar art. I only wish I remembered to take a few pictures to show their outstanding work.

View from my side of the table with a few of my handcrafted charms and earrings.

View from my side of the table with a few of my handcrafted charms and earrings.

Lunch was tasty. The spinach quiche I had was delicious, and my husband’s turkey sandwich was to die for. The ladies of the church made a large selection of great-tasting and healthy food for our bead society.

One of the things that I would do differently would be to better organize our box of organza bags, gift boxes, and sales slips. I threw everything in a box (including extra business cards and pens) under the table, and it was sloppy. I’ll be better set up at our next show.

Show 1 Table

This is a mess. Organization is the key for the next show!

 

Overall, my husband and I had a fun time and sold a lot of our work. I even garnered a few custom orders.

I heartily suggest attending a bead show anywhere there is one available in your area. The work is beautiful, and sure beats the cheap, breakable junk that’s imported from China.

Before the crowds.

Before the crowds.

Support your local artists.

Happy Beading,

Susan Marie Molloy

Designer and Owner, Miss Poppy’s Boutique

 

Up the Beading Road

My beading fascination and business took another exciting turn this past couple of weeks. I am now learning new skills and techniques with beading with threads.

My first project was a simple back-and-forth sewing technique. I used fishing line, cat’s eye beads, and faceted Czech glass beads. I finished it off with a simple silver toggle clasp.

The project went well, and I was finished in an evening.   I wore the bracelet for a few days and decided that fishing line made the bracelet a little too stiff for my liking. I wound up making a similar bracelet for a friend, but this time I used Fireline thread. What a difference! The bracelet was more flexible, lighter, and felt alive. Now I will take apart my bracelet and redo it with Fireline thread.

GrapesSuzetteForBlog

This past weekend, I attended a regular beading class. The project for that morning was the Darby Bracelet (pattern created by Deborah Roberti). It featured a ladder stitch, which I wanted to learn.

After having a slow start to the first portion of the pattern and two tear-outs, I was getting the hang of it. I broke a needle in class, and that does happen from time to time.  I took my unfinished bracelet home, and I was finished that evening. I finished the bracelet at home, and by the time I was more than halfway done, I gained confidence and speed with each stitch. It got to a point where I didn’t have to rely one hundred per cent on reading the pattern. In fact, I only heavily referred to it when I added the clasp.

PathForBlog2

It turned out well, though I made it about one section too much for my wrist. It won’t fall off, but it could be a little bit smaller. My next Darby Bracelet will take care of that.

I find that threading beads is a nice change from wire beading. I plan on creating a few new pieces for my Etsy shop, Miss Poppy’s Boutique. I believe this new beading technique will be a nice addition to what I offer for my customers.

My finished bracelet.

My finished bracelet.

Happy Beading,

Susan Marie Molloy

Play Ball!

I’ve moved towards offering sports-themed accessories and jewelry. What started this was that I had a Chicago White Sox charm, some black and white beads, and wire.

First, I took silver plated copper wire and made jump rings, then connected them with a twist to form the base of my project. Hand wrapping each bead cluster with Czech glass and India glass beads was quick work. Finally, when the White Sox charm went on, I thought something was not quite finished. It needed one more item.

That item was a handmade ceramic baseball bead made in Peru. It was the perfect add-on for my creation!

Although this accessory is a dust plug for Androids, iPhones, Kindle, Tablets, iPads, iPods, et cetera, I can easily convert it to a key chain, gym bag charm, purse or hand bag charm, or car rear view mirror charm at no extra charge. I invite you to click on the photo below to read more on this sporty item.

I will take custom orders on sports-themed accessories and jewelry, so feel free to contact me at Poppy at SusanMarieMolloy dot net.

Play ball!
WhiteSoxCharm5.jpg

©Susan Marie Molloy and all works within.