Tag Archive | Bracelet

Desert Song

DesertSongWrapBraceletBySusanMarieMolloyPhoto3The new Diamonduo beads arrived in my studio a couple weeks ago, and this past week found me doing more design work.

The Diamonduos are approximately 6mm x 8mm and come in a large amount of colors. For my new design, I chose the coral color.

A few mint-colored beads in my supply room caught my eye, and I coordinated the duet of coral and mint with antique gold. Laying all the beads together on the studio worktable, the first thoughts of a soft desert song floating on a breeze came to mind – thus, this piece’s title, “Desert Song Wrap Bracelet.”

As I worked the beads, this project seemed to be (subconsciously) inspired by the many creations of Deborah Roberti of Around the Beading Table. She creates down-to-earth tutorials that can turn any creative artist’s head. You can see her work and shop her tutorials by clicking HERE.

As with my “Queen Twosret” wrap bracelet, “Desert Song” has a beaded peyote stitch toggle clasp. The look is clean, yet elegant.  Depending upon the piece, I would rather have a beaded clasp than a metal one.  Again, it depends on the piece.

The tutorial is now available in my shop, Miss Poppy’s Boutique. Click HERE to read more about it, purchase it, or request one made just for you by me.

In the meantime, listen for that soft desert song wafting in the warm desert breeze.

©Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

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Peeking into Queen Twosret’s Jewel Box

QueenTwosretWrapBraceletTutorialI admit it: I am a fanatic for anything ancient Egyptian, and have been as far back as I can remember.

This week, I obtained some of the new 6mm pyramid beads. They are half the size of the similarly-shaped studs, and much more versatile for my type of creations. This summer I’ve been designing many new projects, and wrap bracelets are just one type.

I took the pyramid beads and combined them with other specialty beads in roughly the same sized category, added seed beads, and I came up with an easy to make wrap bracelet. I enjoy making my own beaded clasps, too, which is what I did for this project.

I used beads in traditional ancient Egyptian colors, and the piece feels like the Pharaohs had an extraordinary influence on this! The blue is like the prized lapis lazuli they used in their jewelry; the precious gold they prized for its flash; the reds of ochre and jasper; the black of the Nile’s rich silt; and the stripes on their headdresses when I created the clasp.

I named this piece “Queen Twosret’s Wrap” after the ancient Egyptian pharaoh Seti II’s wife. Two colors of seed beads are used to give a striped appearance between the larger beads. It adds a little something special, don’t you think?

The tutorial is available now in my shop, Miss Poppy’s Boutique (click HERE to purchase).

Beads are from Poppy and Gene’s Beadery (click HERE for fabulous, high quality beads at affordable prices) .

©Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

A Beaded Garden

Last year, I purchased a tutorial by Marcia Balonis of Baubles by Balonis called “Garden of  Flowers Bracelet.” It wasn’t until I spent this summer visiting public gardens and tending to mine that I had the inspiration to try my hand at Marcia’s tutorial. Yes, I was in a flower garden mood.

This tutorial calls for various flower beads sewn in such a way to conjure colorful sprawling flower beds. After reading through the tutorial (always a plus before you start any project!), I had my version outlined in my head. I was ready, and all that I needed to do was grab my vintage sugar bowl filled with loose orphan beads:

Sugar Bowl

I used all glass beads: flower cups, leaves, dragon scales, drops, seeds, Delicas, two-hole cabochons, buttons, and spiky buttons, just to name a few. I added a red lady bug bead nestled in the flower bed, for a surprise. She’s not flying anywhere because I ran my needle three times through her for security. The hole was fairly large, so I added a small black seed bead on either end to finish it off cleanly.

For the beaded toggle clasp, I used a scarab – whimsy!

GardenBraceletBySusanMarieMolloyInspiredByMarciaBalonisII

Throughout the project, I was careful to make sure that no thread was showing as I sewed. Visible threads annoy me; I prefer a clean, polished look on my creations. Because of this, my process was slow, yet well worth the time.

This “Garden Bracelet” has a nice weight to it; it feels substantial. It also wears nicely on the wrist and sparkles in the sunlight.

SusanMarieMolloysGardenBraceletInspiredbyMarciaBalonisII

You can purchase Marcia’s tutorial through her Etsy shop, Baubles by Balonis (click HERE). Her tutorials are well-written and easy to follow, and priced just right.  (By the way, she is a fabulous teacher, too, as my husband took a class from her earlier this year at the Emerald Coast Bead Retreat.)

My beads are from Poppy and Gene’s Beadery and from my private collection.

Visiting public gardens and tending to my own verdant gardens are just some of my most pleasurable pastimes. The vivid and pastel hues offset by variants of green foliage are delightful and relaxing. My version of a beaded flower garden ensures that a fanciful garden is carried by me, never to wilt and to always bring a smile.

©Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, Miss Poppies Boutique, and all works within.

Ocean Waves Cellini Spiral Bangle

"Ocean Waves Cellini Bangle" (c)Designs by Susan Marie Molloy for Miss Poppy's Boutique

“Ocean Waves Cellini Bangle” (c)Designs by Susan Marie Molloy for Miss Poppy’s Boutique

Last winter, I took a class at the Emerald Coast Bead Retreat in Fort Walton Beach, Florida to learn how to make the Cellini spiral stitch. Since then, it’s become one of my favorite beading stitches.

The Cellini spiral is basically tubular peyote stitch with beads gone wild – a varying amount of different sized and shaped beads make up the unique pattern to create a spectacular piece that gets conversations started.

With this particular project, I went with colors that mimic the warm and undulating ocean waves we see here in Florida, particularly the Gulf of Mexico’s coastline in the panhandle. My colors as like the aquas and blues of the waters, the barely perceptible purple that reveals deep waters, and the golden sunshine that sparkles on the water. The undulating shape of this bangle mimics the ever-moving waves.

I had a lot of fun creating this piece, and it wears beautifully. It may look heavy, but it’s very light and comfortable on the wrist.

It’s one of the classes I will be teaching this summer – I like teaching to help keep the art of beading alive.

I am offering the tutorial and a kit through my Etsy shop, too.  Follow this link HERE.

Maybe a pair of matching earrings would be nice . . . the wheels are turning in my head!

©Designs by Susan Marie Molloy for Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

Checkerboard

Black and White Check2The past weekend found me finishing some beading projects I started last fall. Between a beading cruise we went on in October, to getting custom Christmas ornament covers made, I put some projects aside and . . . well, forgot about them until this weekend.

As I was straightening up and cleaning my studio, I found the half-finished projects sitting patiently in a plastic box. The checkerboard-style cuff bracelet was my first to finish.

As you can see, when finishing off the ends, I prefer using wire/thread guards before attaching the clasp. They help to strengthen the clasp to the piece and prevent the Fireline® thread from fraying. For this bracelet, I used a tube/sliding clasp in silver plate. All beads used in this piece are high quality Czech glass.

Nice, isn’t it?

Black and White Check3

This pattern is from Virginia Jensen’s book, “Stitching with Two-Hole Shaped Beads,” published by Kalmbah Books (2015). The name of the bracelet is “Herringbone Cuff with Squares and Rullas.”  (Found on Amazon.)

I’m keeping this one for myself. The checkerboard look is nice for summer, as well as year-round.

As always, custom orders are always welcomed!

©Susan Marie Molloy, Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.
Black and White Check1

Keeping It Simple and Festive

©Designs by Susan Marie Molloy for Miss Poppy’s Boutique

©Designs by Susan Marie Molloy for Miss Poppy’s Boutique

In this week’s class, I taught the art of crocheting around a ring. This was a simple technique of single and half double crocheting around a bone ring and adding beads to a crocheted “drop-ribbon” that comes off the ruffled ring. I designed this pattern to help teach this “crocheting in rounds” technique and how to incorporate beads in crocheting. For myself, I made a lot of these, and I use them as “markers” on my clothes hangers, just to dress up an otherwise boring closet. Besides, it’s a good way to use up some leftover crochet thread and miscellaneous beads you don’t know what else to do with.

We had a lot of fun, and because I supplied the beads and bone rings gratis, my students only had to bring their crochet thread and a crochet hook – and their appetites. We had homemade hors d’oeuvre that I made and fresh brewed tea to make this afternoon class more festive.

In setting up and organizing my classes, I look for projects that appeal to a wide range of artists, beaders, and crafters. I look for – and I design my own – projects that will be, in the end, useful as a day-to-day item, or pretty things, such as home décor or jewelry. I tend to not focus solely on jewelry, because that gets “boring” as my students mentioned to me. I agree. After all, there is much more to creating than bracelets and earrings.

This weekend I am looking forward to teaching another class, this time, it’s wire working of a different sort. The class is full, but I’ll offer it again in the future.

©Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

Sharing and Expanding

This was an exciting weekend.  I (finally) expanded my business to teaching various art forms, including wire work, beading, crochet, embroidery, et cetera.

I held my first class in my shop, and we had it to full capacity, too!  Gene had to sit this one out; he was busy working in our bead shop, which is important to stay on top with. 

This weekend, the project was a simple one – a delicate bracelet comprised of tiny bicone Austrian crystals with Czech glass seed beads to complement them.  I put kits together with my pattern, so it was easy for my students to choose what they wanted when they arrived. 

Two students finished their projects that morning, and here are a few pictures of their bracelets:

 ClassMarchaClassMarchbClassMarchc

Which do you like best?  I cannot decide which one I like better – the peach or the pale green.  They both are delightful to look at, and so feminine.  Just in time for spring! 

What makes this project so effective is that the artist doesn’t need to have a precise wrist measurement to complete it.  I introduced the technique of adding an extra length of high quality chain on one end.  This way, the wearer can adjust the size accordingly.   It’s practical. 

I believe it’s important for artists to share their knowledge and experiences among each other, and to introduce others to various art forms.  I have classes scheduled for the next several months where just this sort of thing will go on.  As time allows, I’ll share what my students and I are doing, and I invite you to share your thoughts.   

I am also giving private classes during the week and on weekends, so if you live in the Pensacola area, contact me and we’ll make arrangements. Remember – I do a lot more than beadwork, so don’t hesitate to ask what you would like to learn. 

Stay tuned; it’s going to be a fun and enterprising ride.

 ©Susan Marie Molloy, and all works within.