Tag Archive | Peyote Stitch

Moonglow in the Palm of Your Hand

chakra-2aA couple weeks ago, as I was researching for some new projects, I stumbled upon the prettiest cabochons I ever saw:  LunaSoft.

These cabochons have such a beautifully soft and glowing presence about them, they mesmerized me.  When they arrived in my bead shop, one or more of each available color, it was “ooooo” and “ahhhh” non-stop.   It’s one thing to see them in a photograph, and quite another to see them live.

The colors are rich.  The glow is soft.  The backs are metal coated.  The faces feel like they are lightly coated with rubber, or something like it.  The biggest question I had was, “How are they to work with?”

“Wow!” is my answer.

I choose to design a peyote bezel for a pendant using Japanese seed beads and SuperDuo beads, worked around a copper-hued LunaSoft cabochon.  Working the bezel around the cabochon proved to be remarkably pleasant.  I would even go so far to say that the coating seemed to hold the bezel well while stitching.   The way the cabochon seemed to change its glow was amusing.  Depending on how the light hit it, it looked solid, it seemed to glow, or it flashed a rich coppery hue with depth.  I have several more tutorials in the works using LunaSoft cabochons.

Other LunaSoft colors range from reds, to blues, to greens, to oranges, to white and black, and more. At the moment, we have several colors of the round 23mm ones in our bead shop.  I plan to order more in different sizes and shapes to stock in October.  In the meantime, see what’s available now:  CLICK HERE to see more.

If you like something a little different and something fun to work with, I recommend the LunaSoft cabochons, hands down.

If you’d like to learn more about my tutorial, CLICK HERE.

Add some moon glow to your repertoire!

©Susan Marie Molloy, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

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Desert Song

DesertSongWrapBraceletBySusanMarieMolloyPhoto3The new Diamonduo beads arrived in my studio a couple weeks ago, and this past week found me doing more design work.

The Diamonduos are approximately 6mm x 8mm and come in a large amount of colors. For my new design, I chose the coral color.

A few mint-colored beads in my supply room caught my eye, and I coordinated the duet of coral and mint with antique gold. Laying all the beads together on the studio worktable, the first thoughts of a soft desert song floating on a breeze came to mind – thus, this piece’s title, “Desert Song Wrap Bracelet.”

As I worked the beads, this project seemed to be (subconsciously) inspired by the many creations of Deborah Roberti of Around the Beading Table. She creates down-to-earth tutorials that can turn any creative artist’s head. You can see her work and shop her tutorials by clicking HERE.

As with my “Queen Twosret” wrap bracelet, “Desert Song” has a beaded peyote stitch toggle clasp. The look is clean, yet elegant.  Depending upon the piece, I would rather have a beaded clasp than a metal one.  Again, it depends on the piece.

The tutorial is now available in my shop, Miss Poppy’s Boutique. Click HERE to read more about it, purchase it, or request one made just for you by me.

In the meantime, listen for that soft desert song wafting in the warm desert breeze.

©Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

Our Ordering Process and Seizing the Silver Lining

From time to time, we – Gene and I – special order beads for our customers who shop at our bead store, Poppy and Gene’s Beadery. A couple of months ago, we special ordered beads for a customer who wanted to create Tamara Scott’s “Sandbox” bracelet. The customer gave us the numbers of the Miyuki Delicas, and we went ahead and ordered them. Part of our special ordering process is that both Gene and I double-check and triple-check the numbers and/or colors and sizes of what our customers want. And, of course, in this case as always, we did just that.

The beads came, the customer took them, and by the same evening, the customer had a couple of different excuses why she didn’t want them. One of the excuses was claiming we didn’t order the right beads. We checked, and yes, we did, according to her written instructions and the numbers on the pattern. However, for whatever real reason, she returned the beads, and I took that opportunity to create my version of the “Sandbox” bracelet with the very same beads.

This piece is such an eye-catcher, that I already have orders for several bracelets for my friends, in these colors. Looks like I’ll be in the “sandbox” for awhile!

“Sandbox” is a flat peyote (gourd) stitch using even-count. It worked up quickly. It’s an elegant piece that really can be worn day or night, dressed up or down. I particularly like the snaps used to close the bracelet. They give it a seamless, professional looks. What really makes the piece a knockout are the patina charms placed in each box, or “sandbox” if you will.

You can find this pattern on Tamara Scott’s website, Tamara Scott Designs. She also sells the charms via her Etsy store, Tamara Scott Designs.

Always see the silver lining in every experience. I do, and that makes for a lot of positive dynamics and beauty in life.

Tamara Scott's "Sandbox," without and with the patina charms. Yes, the charms really make this a knockout bracelet!

Tamara Scott’s “Sandbox,” without and with the patina charms. Yes, the charms really make this a knockout bracelet!

©Susan Marie Molloy, Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

What’s in a Name

Here we are at the beginning of a new week, and noticing last week went by fast. It definitely was a busy one at my studio.

I held another class. It was a basic needle weaving session using the gourd, or peyote, stitch. This was a new stitch for a few of my six students, and a nice refresher for others. We used one of my own earring designs as a starting point.

This stitch has been around for millennia, and goes as far back as ancient Egypt. I grew up knowing it as the gourd stitch; at some point beaders today more commonly use the term “peyote stitch” instead. What is interesting is that the term “gourd stitch” derives its name from American Indians decorating gourd containers, and “peyote stitch” is derived from American Indians decorating decorative objects used in their peyote ceremonies. Nonetheless, it is the same basic stitch.

I like it for its simplicity and versatility. When I create something using only Delica seed beads, the piece turns out smooth, flat, and slinky. I have modified patterns by using various sizes of seed beads, the most well-known of these is the Cellini stitch. It’s peyote gone ‘round and ‘round with a lot of interesting bumpiness!

We had fun at my class, and we learn from one another. I hold the belief that not only can experienced beaders share their knowledge and talents, but novice beaders bring a lot to the table, too. They see things with fresh, new eyes. And sharing and discussing some background history about the art of beading keeps our conversations between us beaders delightful and positive – and it makes it so much more enjoyable to want to learn more, and to return to my studio to learn and share even more.

©2016 Susan Marie Molloy, Designs by Susan Marie Molloy, The Rosary Shoppe, Miss Poppy’s Boutique, and all works within.

Happy Mistakes

IMG_20150915_122228As most of us artists know, there are happy mistakes.

I took a beading class several months ago.  The premise of the class was to teach the peyote (gourd) stitch with a rivoli and create a pair of earrings.  So, I packed up my beads, scissors, thread, and needle and off I went to class.

The peyote stitch is simple enough, and it is a clean stitch, particularly when using cylinder beads such as Miyuki Delicas.  The cylindrical shape of the beads help to produce a well-fitted and even creation.

The pattern was for a round bezel around round rivolis.  At least that was the idea.  My finished bezel turned out to be a heart shape, not round.  I was such I made a mistake somewhere, until a friend of mine said that her several attempts also created non-round shapes.

What I think happened is that the teacher, in rewriting the original pattern, missed steps or miswrote the instructions.  But then, that is the happy mistake.

I decided to use my heart-shaped peyote stitch piece to create a pendent instead of earrings.  I took the cylinder beads and made a peyote stitch bezel.  What I further plan to do is stitch a rope with cylinder beads and finish it with some sort of clasp.

You see?  A mistake doesn’t really have to be a mistake.

Happy Beading,

Susan Marie Molloy

Artist and Owner, Miss Poppy’s  Boutique

Visit my Etsy shop, Miss Poppy’s Boutique

©SusanMarieMolloy and all works within.